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IS 15809 (2008) : HigH Visibility Warning 
Clothes — Specification. ICS 13.340.10 




Jawaharlal Nehru 
'Step Out From the Old to the New" 



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Invent a New India Using Knowledge 



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1815809:2008 



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Indian Standard 

HIGH VISIBILITY WARNING CLOTHES 
SPECIFICATION 



ICS 13.340.10 



©BIS 2008 
BUREAU OF INDIAN STANDARDS 

MANAK BHAVAN, 9 BAHADUR SHAH ZAFAR MARG 
NEW DELHI 110002 



October 200% Price Group 7 



Occupational Safety and Health and Chemical Hazards Sectional Committee, CHD 8 



FOREWORD 

This Indian Standard was adopted by the Bureau of Indian Standards, after the draft finalized by the Occupational 
Safety and Health and Chemical Hazards Sectional Committee had been approved by the Chemical Division Council. 

High visibility warning clothe is one of the personnel protective equipment worn as a means to provide visual signal 
of the wearer's presence and intended to provide conspicuity of the wearer under any light conditions by day and 
under illumination by vehicle headlights in the dark. Conspicuity is enhanced by increasing the contrast between 
the clothing and its ambient background or surroundings. Classes of visibility hazards are identified and appropriate 
markings for the clothing are suggested based on worker risk hazards, such as complex backgrounds, vehicular 
traffic density and speeds. 

Two different colours for background and combined performance materials are defined, providing options for 
increasing wearer's conspicuity against most backgrounds found in urban and rural work environments. Users 
should consider the prevailing ambient background in which protection is required and select the colour providing 
the preferred contrast. 

Higher photometric performance levels of retroreflective material provide greater contrast and visibility over wider 
viewing angles of safety clothing when seen in headlights during darkness. When greater conspicuity is required, 
the higher performance level of retroreflective material should be used. 

There is no ISO Standard on the subject. This standard is developed indigenously by taking considerable assistance 
from EN 471: 1994 *High Visibility warning clothing'. 

The composition of the Committee responsible for the formulation of this standard is given at Annex D. 

The standard is applicable to all kinds of organizations irrespective of its complexity as well as hazards associated 
with it and is voluntary in nature like all other management systems. A system of this kind enables an organization 
to demonstrate its performance and conformity to the legal requirements. Certifying organization should provide 
information listing all the legislations as identified by the organization and covered in the certification process. 

For the purpose of deciding whether a particular requirement of this standard is complied with, the final value, 
observed or calculated, expressing the result of a test or analysis, shall be rounded off in accordance with IS 2 ; 1960 
'Rules for rounding off numerical values {revisec!)\ The number of significant places retained in the rounded off 
value should be the same as that of the specified value in this standard. 



IS 15809 : 2008 



Indian Standard 

HIGH VISIBILITY WARNING CLOTHES 
SPECIFICATION 



1 SCOPE 

The standard specifies requirements and methods of 
tests for high visibility warning clothing as well as 
recommended configurations of the materials. 

2 REF^ERENCES 

The standards given below contain provisions, which 
through reference in this text, constitute provisions of 
this standard. At the time of publication, the editions 
indicated were valid. All standards are subject to 
revisions, and parties to agreement based on this 
standard are encouraged to investigate the possibility 
of applying the most recent editions of the standards 
indicated below: 

IS No, Title 

686 : 1985 Method for determination of colour 

fastness of textile materials to 
daylight (first revision) 

689 : 1988 Method for determination of colour 

fastness of textile materials to hot 
pressing (first revision) 

762 : 1988 Method for determination of colour 

fastness of textile materials to 
hypochlorite bleaching (first 
revision) 

766 : 1988 Method for determination of colour 

fastness of textile materials to 
rubbing {first re vision ) 

767 : 1988 Method for determination of colour 

fastness of textile materials to water 
(first revision) 

971 : 1983 Method for determination of colour 

fastness of textile materials to 
pi^i'spn-'dUon (first revision) 

2454 : 1985 Methods for determination of colour 

fastness of textile materials to 
artificial light (Xenon lamp) (first 
revision) 

48()2 : 1988 Method for determination of colour 

fastness of textile materials to dry- 
clean i n g (// r.v/ /e v/a/V;/ 2 ) 

12673 : 1989 Textile fabrics — Abrasion resistance- 

Methods for determination 

13025 : 1991 Method for determination of colour 

fastness of textile materials to 
domestic and commercial laundering 



IS No. Title 

14221 : 1995 Automotive vehicles — Retroreflective 

sheets and tapes — Specification 

IS 15370 : 2005/ Textiles — Domestic washing and 
ISO6330 : 2(W drying procedures for textile testing 

ISO 3175-2 : 1998 Professional care, dry cleaning and 
wet cleaning of fabrics and 
garments — -Part 2 : Procedures for 
testing performance when cleaning 
and finishing using tertrachloroethene 

3 TERMIN0IXM5Y 

For the purpose of this standard the following terms 
and definitions shall apply. 

3.1 Background Material — Coloured fluorescent 
material intended to be highly conspicuous in the 
day time, but not intended to comply with the 
requirements of these guidelines for retroreflective 
material. 

3.2 Certify — Testing by third party to verify 
performance requirements as specified in this standard. 

3.3 Coefficient of Luminous Intensity — Ratio of 
luminous intensity of the retroreflector in the direction 
of observation to the illuminance at the retroreflector 
on a plane perpendicular to the direction of the incident 
light. 

3.4 Coefficient of Retroreflection — The ratio of the 
coefficient of luminous intensity of a plane 
retroreflecting surface to its area and expressed in 
candela per lux per square metre (cd. Ix'.m^), 

35 Combined-Performance Material — Retroreflec- 
tive material which is also a fluorescent materiaL 

3.6 Coospkuity — The characteristics of an object 
which determine the likelihood that it will come to the 
attention of an observer, especially in a complex 
environment which has objects competing for attention 
of the observer. 

3.7 Entrance Angle- — The angle between the 
illumination axis and the retroreflector axis. 

3.8 Fluorescent Material — Material thalemits optical 
radiation at wavelengths longer than it absorbed. These 
materials enhance day time visibility, particularly during 
the hours of dawn and dusk. 



IS 15809 : 2008 



3,9 High Visibility Warning Clothes — Personal 
protective safety clothing intended to provide 
conspicuity during both day time and night time usage. 

3*10 Observation Angle — Angle between the 
illumination axis and the observation axis. 

3.11 Photometric Performaece Level -— The 
effectiveness of retrorefiecti ve material in returning light 
to its source, expressed in Table 5 as Level 2 and Table 
6 as Level 1, and measured in terms of coefficient of 

relroretlection (Ra). 

3.12 Retroreflector Axis — Usually perpendicular to 
the surface of the retrorefiecti ve material. 

3.13 Retroreflective Malerlal ■ — Material which is a 
retroreflector that is, it reflects the light falling on it, 
back to the source of light and is either not intended to 
comply with the requirements of these guidelines for 
background material, or is a combined-performance 
material. 

3*14 Rotatlop Angle — Angle indicating the 
orientation of the specimen when it is rotated about the 
retroreflector axis. 

4 CLASSIFICATION 

41 Types — High visibility warning clothes are of two 
types depending on the colour for background and 
combined performance materials: 

a) Type 1 —Fluorescent yellow — Green, and 

b) Type 2 — ■ Fluorescent orange — Red, 

42 Each type of high visibility warning clothing are 
classified based on the level of conspicuity as follows: 

a) Class 1 —For use in occupational activities 

that permit full and undivided 
attention to approaching traffic. 

b) C/a.!i\v2— For use in occupational activities 

where users require greater visibility 
for inclement weather conditions, 
activities on or near roadways with 
higher traffic lev els. 

c) Class 3— For use in high-risk occupations 

when workers are exposed to high- 
speed traffic, or a wide range of 
weather conditions. 

N01^E — The conspicLuiy classes and examples of 
applicable workers are provided in Annex A. While 
the area of materials used is driven by the type of 
garment and size of the wearer, X^lass 3 clothes intend 
to offer greater visibility against most urban and rural 
backgrounds than Class 2 clothes, which in turn are 
significantly superior than Class 1 clothes. Annex A 
provides a description of these conspicuity classes 
and the recommended applications. 



5 REQUIREMENTS 

5.1 Materials 

5,L1 Retrorefiecti ve and background materials shall 
conform to the performance requirements as specified 

in 53 and 5.4. 

5.1*2 The material shall not dissolve or pucker when 
wiped with a soft cloth containing methylated spirit, 
kerosene, unleaded gasoline, methanol and naptha 
solvent. 

5.2 Garment Besige 

5.2,1 Specific Design Requirements for Retro reflective 
Materials 

52X1 Width of bands 

Bands of retroreflective material shall not be less than 
50 mm for Class 3 and Class 2 clothes, and shall meet the 
minimum perforniance shown in Table 1 or Table 2. 
Class 1 clothes shall be constructed with retroreflective 
material bands of not less than 25 mm. Alternatively, 
Class 1 clothes can be constructed with combined- 
performance material meeting minimum performance 
requirements in Table 1 or Table 2 and shall not be less 
than 50 mm in width. 

Table 1 Minimum Coeffideol of 
RetroreOection (cd.lx*^ .m"^) 

for RetroreOectlve Material 



SI 


Observation 
Angle 




Entrance Angle 




No. 


5" 


20" 


30" 


40" 


(1) 


(2) 


(3) 


(4) 


(5) 


(6) 


i) 


12' 


330 


290 


180 


65 


ii) 


20' 


250 


200 


170 


60 


iii) 


V 


25 


15 


12 


10 


iv) 


V30' 


10 


7 


5 


4 



Table 2 Minimum Coefficleot of 
RetroreOection (cd.lx'^ .ni"'^) for Combined- 
Performance Material 
{Clauses 5 2. [A and 53 2 A) 



Si 


Observation 
Angle 




Entrance 


Angle 




No. 


5" 


20'" 


30" 


40' 


(1) 


(2) 


(3) 


(4) 


(5) 


(6) 


i) 


12" 


250 


220 


135 


50 


ii) 


20' 


120 


100 


75 


30 


iij) 


1" 


25 


15 


12 


10 


iv) 


130' 


10 


7 


5 


4 



18 15809:2008 



5. 2 J. 2 Multiple bands 

For multiple bands placed on the garment, the bands 
shall be placed at a spacing distance of at least equal to 
the width of the band. 

5.2.13 Bands near bottom edge 

For horizontal bands placed near the bottom edge of 
the jacket or vest, the spacing shall be not less than 
50 mm above the bottom edge. For trousers, horizontal 
bands on the legs shall be not more than 350 mm above 
the bottom edge of the legs. 

5,2. L4 Bands on sleeves 

Whenever horizontal bands are placed on full-length 
sleeves of coveralls andjackets, the band shall encircle 
the arm and be placed at the same height on the garment 
as the retroreflective band on the torso. Upper bands 
shall encircle the upper part of the sleeves between 
elbow and shoulder. Lower bands shall not be less than 
50 mm from the bottom of the sleeve. 

5.2. L5 Gaps 

Gaps in retroreflective and background material for the 
purpose of fastening devices shall not be more than 
50 mm horizontally. 

5.2.1.6 360"^ Band placement 

All classes of clothes shall have continuous areas of 
retroreflective material encircling the torso, placed in 
such a manner as to provide 360° visibility of the wearer. 

5.2.1.7 Minimum area of visible material and 
retroreflective niaterial 

Each class of high visibility safety clothes shall have 
the minimum area of materials incorporated in the 
garment in accordance with Table 3. The specified level 
of retroreflective material selected shall be indicated on 
the garment label as described in 6.1.1. 

5.2.2 Garment Design Configurations 

Coveralls, jackets and vests shall be designed to permit 
maximum visibility of the wearer. Bands of retroreflective 
material in the garments may be inclined but to a maximum 
oft 20". Graphic examples have been given in Annex B . 

NOTE — Maximum visibility may be obtained by 
endorsing: 

a) two horizontal bands of retroreflective material 
around the torso in case of coverall; 

b) with one or more horizontal bands of retroreflective 
material around the torso and bands of retroreflective 
material joining the uppermost torso band from the 
front to the back over each shoulder in case of jackets 
and vests; and 

c) two bands of retroreflective material should encircle 
the sleeves at the same height as those on the torso 
for coveralls and jackets with full-length sleeves. 



Harnesses shall comprise a band of combined- 
performance retroreflective material encircling the waist 
and joining the waistband from the back to the front 
over both shoulders, the bands being not less than 
50 mm wide. 

NOTE — Harnesses complying with this standard are 
not intended to provide protection against fall from 
heights. 

Table 3 Mloimum Areas of Visible Material 
( Clauses 52.1.7 and 533 ) 



SI 
No. 


Class of High VlsibiUty 
Warning Clothing 


Class 
3 


Class 
2 


Class 
1 


(1) 


(2) 


(3) 


(4) 


(5) 



i) Background material, m^ 



0.80 0.50 0.14 



ii) a) Retroreflective material 0.20 0.13 0.10 

or combined-performance 
material used in conjunction 
with background 
material, m^ 



b) Combined-performance 
materia] used without 
background material, m^ 

iii) Metre per retroreflective 
band width 



0.20 



3.9 m 2.6 m 3.9 m 

of of of 

50 mm 50 mm 25 mm 

wide wide wide 

band band band 

1.97 m 
of 

50 mm 
wide 
band 



5.3 Coloor 

5.3.1 Colour of Background Material and Combined- 
Performance Retroreflective Material Prior to 
Exposure Tests 

53.1.1 The chromaticity value of the background 
material and combined-performance retroreflective 
material shall lie within one of the areas given in Table 4 
and Table 5 respectively when measured at each of the 
two rotation angles in accordance with C-2 of this 
standard. 

53.1.2 The minimum luminance factor of the 
background material and combined-performance 
retroreflective material shall be as given in Table 4 and 
Table 5 respectively when measured at each of the two 
rotation angles in accordance with C-2 of this standard. 

53.2 Colour Fastness of Background Material 

5.3.2.1 Colour fastness to crocking 

The colour fastness of background material to crocking 
both wet and dry shall be at least a grade 4.0 by the gray 



IS 15809 : 2008 



scale for staining when tested in accordance with 
IS 766. 

Table 4 Colour : Background Material 

(Clauses53AA,53A2and5323) 



SI 


Colour 


Chromaticity 


Minimum 


No 




Coordinates 


Luminance 






>v 


Factor 




r 


^ 






X 


Y 


p Min 


( 1 


) ( 2 ) 


( 3) 


(4) 


(5) 


1) 


Fluorescent 


0.387 


0.610 


^ 




yellow-green 


0,356 
0,398 
0.460 


0.494 
0.452 
0.540 


> 0,76 


ii) 


Fluore-scenl 


0.610 


0,390 


■N 




orange -red 


0.544 


0.376 


>• 0.40 






0.579 


0.341 






0,655 


0.344 


J 



Table 5 Colour: Combined-Performance 

Retroreflective Material 

{aauses3AUS3AA,53A2and5AA) 



SI Colour 


Chromaticity 


Minimum 


No. ■ 


Coor 


dinates 


Luminance 




r 




Factor 




X 


Y 


pMm 


1 1 ) ( 2 ) 


(3) 


(4) 


(5) 


i) Fluorescent 


0.387 


0.610 


"^ 


yellow- green 


0.356 
0.398 


0,494 

0.452 


V 0.76 




0.460 


0.540 


^ 


ii) Fluorescein 


0.610 


0,390 


-N 


orange -red 


0.544 
0.579 


0,376 

0.341 


> 0.40 




0.655 


0,344 


^ 



53.2.2 Colour fastness to perspiration 

The colour fastness of background material to 
perspiration shall be at least a grade 4.0 for colour change 
by the grey scale and at least a grade 3,0 for staining by 
the grey scale for staining when tested in accordance 
with IS 971. 

5.3.2.3 Colour fastness — When laundered, dry- 
cleaned, hypochlorite bleached and hot-pressed 

Colour fastness of background material shall be at least 
the grade specified in col 3 of Table 4 when determined 
in accordance with the test methods stated in col 4 of 
Table 6. Specimens shall be dried hanging in air at a 
temperature not exceeding 60°C with parts in contact 
only at the lines of stitching. Samples shall be pressed 
in the dry state only in case of hot-pressing. 

5.3.2.4 Colour fastness of background materials after 
Xenon test 

The colour of background material after exposure shall 
be within the areas defined by the coordinates in Table 
2 and the luminance factor shall be not less than the 
corresponding minimum values given in Table 2 when 
tested in accordance with IS 2454, 

5.3.3 Colour Fastness of Combined-Performance 
Materials After Xenon Test 

The colour of combined-performance materials after 
exposure shall be within the areas defined by the 
coordinates in Table 3 and the luminance factor shall be 
not less than the corresponding minimum values in Table 
3. The light fastness of the combined-performance 
materials shall be determined in accordance with test 
method specified in IS 2454. Exposure shall continue 
until the blue scale control standard number 5 has 
changed to step 3 of the grey scale for red and orange- 
red materials, and the blue scale control standard number 
4 has changed to step 4 of the grey scale for yellow- 
green materials. 



Table 6 Colour Fastness 
(Clauses3Al,5323and5AA) 



SI No. 



( 1 ) 



Care Process 



( 2 ) 



Fastness, Grade of the Grey 


Method of Test 


Scale, At least 


Ref to 


(3 ) 


(4 ) 


Colour change: Grade 4 to 5; 


IS 13025 


Staining : Grade 3.0 




Colour shade change : 4 


IS 4802 


Colour shade change : 4 


!S 762 



Domestic and commercial laundry 



11) 


I^ry cleaning 


111) 


Mypoehlonle bleaehing: 




a) Domestic 




b) Commercial 


1 y ) 


Hot-pressing 



Test conditions 5A 
Test conditions 4A 

Colour change : 4 to 5 
Staining : 3.0 



IS 689 



Water 



Colour change and staining : Grade 4 



IS 767 



IS 1S809 t 2008 



5.4 Photometric and Physical Performance 
Requiremeots for Retroretlective and Conibiiied- 
Performaoce Materials 

5,4 J Performance Requirements of Retro reflective and 
Combined-Performance Material Prior to Test 
Exposure 

When tested as per C>3, at the two rotation angles £l =: 0"* 
and e2 - 90'', retroreflective and combined-performance 
materia! shall comply with the minimum requirements 
for the coefficient of retroreflection stated in Table 5 
and Table 6 respectively, at one of the two rotation 
angles; and shall be not less than 85 percent of the 
values stated in Table 5 and Table 6, respectively, at the 
other rotation angle. 

NOTE — The values for retroreHeciive material are for 

any colour. 

5.4,2 Performance Requirements of Retroreflective and 
Combined-Performance Material After Test Exposure 

The retroreflective and combined-performance material 
tested in accordance with 5.3 above shall be exposed to 
the conditions as specified in Table 7, After exposure 
each test specimen shall fulfil the photometric 
requirements listed below: 

a) The coefficient of retroreflection (Ra), measured 
at observation angle 12' and entrance angle 5*", 
shall exceed 100 cd/(lx.m^) at one of the two 
orientations described in €-3, and 

b) It shall be not less than 85 percent of those required 

values at the other orientation. 

Table? Test Exposure 



SI 


Test Exposure 




Proced 


ure for Exposure of 


No, 






Retroreflective and 








Comb 


ined-Performance 








Retroreflective Material 


( I 


(2) 






(3) 


i) 


Abrasion 






See C-4.i 


ii) 


Flexing 






See C=4,2 


iVi) 


Temperature variation 




See C-4.3 


iv) 


Washing 






See C-4.4 


V) 


Dry cleaning 






See C-4.5 


vi) 


Influence of rair 


fall 




See C-4o6 



5,5 Raised Temperature Test 

When subjected to the raised temperature test at iOO^'C 
for 30 min the material shall show no physical damage 
likely to affect their utility as part of the garment, no 
appreciable change in colour, no migration of colour 
which would affect their visual performance as part of 
the garment, and shall retain the brightness level of at 
least 200 cd.lx"'.m^^ for retroreflective materials and 
SO cd.ix"' .m~- for combined-performance materials, when 
measured in accordance with 8.3 of IS 1422 1 . 



6 FACMNGANDMARHNG 

6.1 Marking 

6.U Each piece of warning clothing shall be marked 
legibly on the product itself or on labels attached to the 
products, with the following information: 

a) Name, trade-mark or other means of identification 
of the manufacturer or authorized representative, 

b) Size designation, 

c) Fabric content, and 

d) Garment class and level of performance for the 
retroreflective material. 

NOTE — The marking should be large enough to convey 
immediate understanding and to allow the use of readily 
legible characters. 

6.1,2 BIS Certification Marking 

The product may also be marked with the Standard Mark. 

6.1.2,1 The use of the Standard Mark is governed by 
the provisions of the Bureau of Indian Standards Act, 
1986 and the Rules and Regulations made thereunder. 
The details of conditions under which the licence for 
the use of the Standard Mark may be granted to 
manufacturers or producers may be obtained from the 
Bureau of Indian Standards. 

6.2 Packing 

The material shall be packed suitably as agreed to 
between the buyer and the seller. 

7 INSTRUCTIONS FOR USE 

Written information shall be supplied together with the 
garment on instructions for use, and shall include the 
following: 

a) Fitting — how to put on and take off, if relevant; 

b) Necessary warnings of misuse; 

c) Limitations on use; 

d) Storage — how to store and maintain correctly, 
with maximum periods between maintenance 
checks; 

e) Maintenance and cleaning — how to clean or 
decontaminate correctly, with complete washing 
and/or dry-cleaning instructions; and 

f) Number of cleaning processes without impairment 
of garment's performance level. 

NOTE ^ — Visibility of background and retrorefiective 
materials will deteriorate with exposure and use. 

8 SAMPLING AND CRITERIA FOR CONFORMITY 

Sampling for test and the criteria for conformity shall be 
as per Annex C. 



iS 15809 : 2008 



ANNEXA 
{Clause 42) 

CONSPICUITYCLASSESAND EXAMPLES OF APPLICABLEWORKERS 



A-1 It is recommended that the selection of conspicuity class be based on the class definition that best represents 
the highest intermittent or continuous exposure encountered by the worker. 

A-2 CONSPICUITY CLASSES 



Conspicuity Class 1 

Conspicuity level for use in occupational activities which: 

a) permit full and undivided attention to approaching traffic, 

b) provide ample separation of the worker from conflicting 
vehicle traffic, 

c) permit optimum conspicuity in backgrounds that are not 
complex, and 

d) involve vehicle and moving equipment speeds not exceed- 
ing 40 km/h. 



Examples of Workers in Class 1 

i) Workers directing vehicle operators to 
parking/service areas 

ii) Workers retrieving shopping carts from 
parking areas 

iii) Workers exposed to hazards of 
warehouse equipment traffic 

iv) Roadside maintenance workers 

v) DeHvery vehicle drivers 



Conspicuity Class 2 

Conspicuity level for use in occupational activities where 
risk levels exceed those in Class 1, such as where: 

a) greater visibility is desired during inclement weather 
conditions, 

b) complex backgrounds are present, 

c) workers are performing tasks which divert attention from 
approaching vehicle traffic, 

d) vehicle of moving equipment speeds exceed 40 km/h, and 

e) work activities take place in or in near proximity to 
vehicle traffic. 



Examples of Workers in Class 2 

i) Roadway construction workers 

ii) Utility workers 

iii) Survey crews 

iv) Railway workers allow risk areas 

v) School crossing guards 

vi) High- volume parking personnel 

vii) Toll gate personnel 

viii) Airport baggage handlers & ground crew 

ix) Emergency response personnel 

^ Law enforcement personnel 

xi) Accident site investigators 



Conspicuity Class 3 

Conspicuity level for use in occupational activities where risk 
levels exceed those in Glass 2, such as where: 

a) workers are exposed to traffic speeds exceeding 80 km/h, 

b) pedestrian worker and vehicle operator have high task 
loads, clearly placing the pedestrian worker in danger, and 

c) the worker must be conspicuous through the full range of 
body motions at a minimum of 390 m ( 1 280 feet), and 
must be identifiable as a person. 



Examples of Workers in Class 3 

i) Roadway construction workers 

ii) Utility workers 

iii) Survey crews 

iv) Emergency response personnel 

v) Railway workers at high risk areas 
(working on track such as gangman, track 
machine staff, night patrol man, gate 
keeper etc.) 



IS 15809 : 2008 



A-2 J Applicable Conditions 



Class 1 



Class 2 



Class 3 



General description of 
conspicuily level 



Roadway Conditions 



Worker's Background 



Vehicle and moving 
equipment speeds 

Examples of Workers 
defined in this Class 



For use in occupational 
activities that permit full and 
undivided attention to 
approaching traffic 



Roadway or roadside 
conditions that provide 
ample separation of the 
pedestrian worker from 
conflicting vehicle traffic 



Not complex 
— permitting 
conspicuity 



optimum 



Not exceeding 40 km/h 



For use in occupational 
activities where users 
require greater visibility for 
inclement weather 

conditions, activities on or 
near roadways with higher 
traffic levels 

Roadway situations which 
do not provide ample 
separation of the pedestrian 
from conflicting vehicle 
traffic 

Complex 

— tasks which divert 
attention from 

approaching traffic 

40 to 80 km/h 



a) Workers who direct a) Roadway workers in 
vehicle operators to urban or high traffic 
parking/service locations suburban areas 

b) Workers exposed to the b) Utility workers 
hazards of warehouse 

equipment traffic c) Survey crews 



c) Workers engaged in 
roadside/sidewalk 
maintenance 

d) Delivery vehicle drivers 



d) Railway workers 

e) School crossing guards 

f) High- volume parking 
and/or toll gate 
personnel 

g) Emergency response 
personnel 

h) Law enforcers 
(especially those 
directing traffic or 
conducting traffic 
accident site 
investigations) 



For use in high-risk 
occupations when workers 
are exposed to high-speed 
traffic, or a wide range of 
weather conditions 



Roadway situations where 
the pedestrian and vehicle 
operator have high task 
loads— clearly placing the 
pedestrian in danger 



Complex 



Exceeding 80 km/ph 

a) Utility workers 

b) Survey crews 

c) Emergency response 
personnel 

d) Railway workers 

e) Accident site 
investigators 



IS 15809 : 2008 



ANNEX B 
(Clause 522) 

GRAPHIC EXAMPLES OF VESTS, JACKETS AND COVEIMLLS 

B-1 Graphic examples of Vests (class 2), Jackets (class 3), Coveralls (class 3) and Coverall with inclined bands 
(class 3) are given in Fig. 1 , Fig. 2, Fig. 3 and Fig. 4 respectively. 

©BANDS 




Jj 



> 50—^ 

All dimensions in millimetres. 
Fig. i Example of Class 2 Vests 






/(i 










All dimensions in millimetres. 
Fig. 2 Example of Class 3 Jacket 



■>50 



>50 




>50 



360 



>50" 
All dimensions in millimetres. 

Fig. 3 Example of Class 3 Coverall 




AH dimensions in millimetres. 

Fig, 4 Example of Class 3 Coverall with Inclined 
Bands Retroreflective Material 



IS 15809 : 2008 



ANNEX C 
{Clauses 5.4.1 and 8) 

SAMPLING AND CRITERIA FOR CONFORMITY 



C4 SAMPLING AND CONDITIONING 

C-Ll Specimens 

Test specimens shall be taken at random from 
commercially available quantities representative of 
commercially available quality. 

C-1.2 Preparation of Specimens 

The size, shape and quantity shall be as required for 
each test procedure. 

C-13 Number of Tests 

Unless otherwise specified, one specimen of each 
material shall be tested and shall comply with the 
minimum requirements. 

C-1.4 Conditioning of Specimens 

The specimens shall be conditioned for at least 24 h at 
27 ± 2''C and 65 ± 5 percent relative humidity. If the tests 
are carried out in other conditions, the tests shall be 
conducted within 5 min after withdrawal from the 
conditioning atmosphere. 

C-2 DETERMINATION OF COLOUR 

C-2,1 Genera! 

Colour shall be measured in accordance with the 
procedure as given below with polychromatic 
illumination D^^ and 45/0 ( or 0/45 ) geometry and 2° 
standard observer. 

C-2,LI Apparatus 

C-2. LI. 1 Spectrometer, any suitable spectrometer 
designed for the measurement of reflectance factor using 
one or more of the standard influx and efflux geometries 
for colour evaluation. 

C-2.1.L2 Illuminator, polychromatic illumination D^^ 

C-2.LL3 Dispersive element, wavelength range from 
300 to 830 mm and the wavelength measurement interval 
of 1 nm. 

C-2J.L4 Detecto.A photo electronic device 
(phototube or photomultiplier), silicon photodiode or 
any other suitable photo detector. 

C-2.2 Test Specimens 

Test specimen shall be representative of the material 
being tested and should be uniform in optical properties 
over the area illuminated and measure. The specimen 
shall have a black underlay with a reflectance of less 
than 0.04. 

NOTE — Specimens should be handled carefully to avoid 
contamination. Care should be taken not to touch the 
area to be measured except for application of a suitable 
cleaning procedure. 



C-23 Standardization 

Standardize the spectrometer using an ideal (white) 
standard with an assigned reflectance factor 100.0 
(percent) and use a highly polished black glass standard 
with an assigned reflectance factor of zero. 

C-2.4 Procedure 

C-2. 4.1 To the extent allowed by the available 
instrument select the appropriate source type, 
illuminating and viewing geometry and the wavelength 
range and wavelength measurement interval. 

C-2. 4. 2 When the instrument is interfaced to a 
computer so that calculation of CIE tristimulus values 
and derived color coordinates automatically follows 
measurement, select the variables defining these 
computations. 

C-2.4.3 Measure the color coordinates and other data 
following the instrument manufacturers instructions. 

C-3 METHOD FOR DETERMINATION OF 
RETROREFLECTIVE PHOTOMETRIC 

PERFORMANCE 

The coefficient of retroreflection (Ra) shall be determined 
in accordance with the procedure as specified in 8.3 of 
IS 14221. 

Measurements shall be made on square samples of 
10 cm X lOcmorof thesizeof the pre-tested samples. 

Ra for the sample shall be measured at the specified 
observation angle and entrance angle for both the O'', 
and 90^^ positions of the rotation angle e. The position 
O'' is determined by one of the following means: 

a) A clear datum mark on each sample, and 

b) A clear instruction given by the manufacturer 
of the material. 

[f no mark or instruction exists, the position e = 0" can 
be chosen at random. 

C4 RETRORFi^LECnONAFrERTESTFJa*OSURE 

C-4.1 Abrasion 

The test sample shall be abraded in accordance with 7.2 
of IS 12673, using a woollen fabric abradent for 
5 000 cycles, using a weight of 9 kPa. 

C-4.2 Flexing 

The test sample shall be flexed in accordance with 8 of 
IS 12673 for 7 500 cycles. 

C-4.3 Exposure to Temperature Variation 

Specimens of the size of 180 mm x 30 mm shall be 
exposed continuously to a cycle of changing 



IS 15809 : 2008 



temperatures: 

a) For 12 h at 50 ± 2°C immediately followed by, 

b) 20hat-30±2^C,and 

c) Conditioning for at least 2 h in accordance with 

€%1. 

C-4.4 Washing 

C"4,4.1 When the marking on the garment (see 6, LI) 
indicates that it is suitable for washing, the 
retroreflective material shall be washed for a minimum 
of 50 washing cycles as per the procedure defined in 
C"4.4,2. When the marking on the garment indicates 
that the garment is suitable for both washing and 
dry-cleaning, separate samples shall be tested following 
both the procedures defined in C-4.4 and C-4.5. 

G-4.4.2 Three clothing fabric specimens 300 mm x 250 
mm shall be prepared with two stripes of retroreflective 
material, each 250 mm x 30 mm, with a distance between 
two stripes of 30 mm. The test samples shall be washed 
for a minimum of 50 cycles in accordance with IS 15370 
using Type A washing machine and procedure 2 A for 
separate performance retroreflective material, procedure 
5 A for combined performance material. 



€-4,5 Dry Cleaning 

When the marking on the garment indicates that it is 
suitable for dry cleaning, the material shall be processed 
for a minimum of five dry cleaning cycles in accordance 
with method SJ of ISO 3175-2. 

When the marking on the garment (see 6,1.1) indicates 
that the garment is suitable for both washing and dry- 
cleaning, separate samples shall be tested following both 
the procedures defined in C-4.4 and C-4,5. 

C-4.6 ReiroreflectlYe PerformaEce m Rainfall 

Samples shall be tested in accordance with the method 

specified under C-4.6 J to C-4,63. 

C-4.6J. Principle 

A specimen of the material is mounted in a vertical plane 
and subjected to a continuous spray of water droplets. 
Measurements are made of the coefficient of 
retroreflection of the wetted surface while the spray is 
maintained, simulating the optical behavior of a surface 
in a shower of rain. 

C-4.6.2 Apparatus 

A suitable apparatus for mounting the specimen in the 
spray of water is illustrated in Fig. 5. 




Fig. 5 Apparatus for the Wet Retroreflection Test 
10 



IS 15S09 t 2008 



The specimen A is supported on the vertical specimen 
holder B above the catch trough C and drain D. The 
specimen holder is rigidly attached to the goniometer 
table (not shown) but is held away from it. The spray 
nozzle E is rigidly supported in a position which is fixed 
relative to the specimen and is supplied with tap water 
at constant but adjustable pressure through a flexible 
joint For hose. 

The nozzle is one metre away from the specimen and is 
so angled that the spray strikes the specimen at an angle 
of IC to the vertical The specimen, specimen holder 
and spray nozzle are enclosed in a cover G designed to 
protect the optical apparatus from water. 

Preferably, the cover is made of or incorporated large 
areas of rigid transparent plastics material for visibility 
and has at least one removable panel or door for ac- 
cess. A" square aperture //of side 150 mm is provided 
for the light path and a gutter / protects this aperture 
from failing water. The region of the cover near to this 
aperture is painted matt black to reduce spray reflec- 
tions. The nozzle consists of an orifice of diameter 1.19 
mm with an appropriately designed feed pipe produc- 
ing a substantially uniform solid cone spray. 



C"4.6o3 Procedure 

Calibrate the apparatus for measuring the coefficient of 
retroreflection R' with the wet testing apparatus in place, 
under both dry and wet conditions and determine a 
correction for change in spray light between these two 
conditions. 

Mount a flat, square specimen of the material of side 
not less than 50 mm in a vertical plane of the vertical 
specimen holder so that the holder does not protrude 
beyond the edge of the specimen at any point; If the 
material is orientation sensitive when dry, as described 
in 6.1 mount it so that measurements can be made at the 
orientation which gate the lowest performance when dry. 
Adjust the nozzle and water supply to subject the speci- 
men to a spray of ordinary tap water such that the whole 
face of the specimen is within the envelope of the spray, 
the angle 8 between the surface of the specimen and the 
water striking it is not less that 5'\ and the flow rate 
striking the specimen is equivalent to a rainfall, in mil- 
limeters perhour, of 50/tan 8 as measured in a horizon- 
tal collector. Maintain the spray in a steady state for at 
least 2 min before and throughout the measurement. 



ANNEX D 
{Foreword) 

COMMfTTEE COMTOSniON 
Occupational Safety and Health and Chemical Hazards Sectional Commiittee, CHD 8 



Organization 
National Safely Council, Navi Mumbai 
irport Authority of India, New Delhi 

Alkali Manufacturers' Association of India, 
Delhi 

Atomic Energy Regulatory Board, Mumbai 

Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 

Central Boiler Board, New Delhi 
Central Leather Research Institute, Chennai 
Central Mming Research Institute, Dhanbad 
Central Warehousing Corporation, New Delhi 

Century Rayon, Thane 

Confederation of Indian Industries, New Delhi 



Consumer Education & Research Centre, 
Ahmedabad 

Department of Industrial Policy and Promotion, 
New Delhi 

Department of Space (ISRO), Sriharikota 



Representative(s) 

Shri K. C. GurrA [Chairman) 

Shri A.N. Khera 

Shri M. Durairajan [Alternate) 

Dr Y- R. Singh 

Shri K. Bhattacharya 

Shri S. Soundararajan 

Shri S. D. Bharambe [Alternate) 

RcPRESEf^ATIVE 

SiiRI G. SWAMINAIISAN 

Shri J. K. Pandey 

Shri F. C, Chadda 

Shrj S. C. Gupta [Alternate) 

SlIRl H. G. U'lTAMCHANDAN! 

Shri S. K. Mishra (Alternate) 

Shri A. K. Ghose: 

Shri Anik Ajmera [Alternale) 

Dr C. J. Shlshoo 

Shri S. Yellore {Alternate) 

Dr D. R. Chawla 

Shri K. Vishwanatman 

Si-jri V, K. Srivastava [AUernate) 



11 



IS 15809 : 2008 



Ori^anlzation 

Directorate General Factory Advice Service & 
Labour Institute, Mumbai 

Directorate General of Health Services, New Delhi 



Directorate General of Mines Safety, Dhanbad 



Directorate of Industrial Safety and Health, Mumbai 

Directorate of Standardization, Ministry of Defence, 
New Delhi 

Ennployees State Insurance Corporation, New Delhi 



Hindustan Aeronautics Limited, Bangalore 
Hindustan Lever Limited, Mumbai 

Indian Association of Occupational Health, Bangalore 
Indian Chemical Manufacturers Association, Mumbai 

Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, Hyderabad 

Indian Institute of Safety and Environment, Chennai 

Indian Petrochemical Corporation Ltd, Vadodara 

Indian Toxicology Research Centre, 
Lucknow 

Ministry of Defence (DGQA), New Delhi 

Ministry of Defence (R&D), Kanpur 

Ministry of Environment & Forest, New Delhi 
Ministry of Home Affairs, New Delhi 

National Institute of Occupational Health, Ahmedabad 

National Safety Council, Navi Mumbai 

NOCIL, Mumbai 



Office of the Development Commissioner (SSI), 
New Delhi 

Oil Industry Safety Directorate (Ministry of Petroleum 
& Natural Gas), Delhi 

Ordnance Factory Board, Kolkata 



Petroleum & Explosives Safety Organization, Nagpur 
Safety Appliances Manufacturers Association, Mumbai 

SIEL Chemical Complex, New Delhi 

Southern Petrochemical Industries Corporation Ltd, 
Chennai 

Steel Authority of India Ltd, Ranchi 

Tata AIG Risk Management Services Ltd, Mumbai 



Representative(s) 

Dr a. K. Majumdar 

Shri H. Vishwanathan {Alternate) 

Dr P. H. Anathanarayanan 
Dr a. N. Sinha {Alternate) 

Director of Mines (MSE) 

Deputy Director of Mines Safety (HQ) {Alternate) 

Shri S. D. Jagtap 

Shri P. S. Ahuja 

Lt-Col Tejinder Singh (Alternate) 

Dr a. M. Paxil 

Dr G. N. Bankafur {Alternate) 

Shri S. V. Suresh 

Shri B. B. Dave 

Shri Aditya Jhavar {Alternate) 

Representative 

Shri Prakash Wagle 

Shri A. A. Panjwan[ (Alternate) 

Shri K. V. Ramanayya 



DrM. Rajendran 

Dr G . Venkatarathnam (Alternate) 

Shri P. Vuayraghavan 

Shri M. R. Patel (Alternate) 

Dr Virendra Mishra 

Dr V. P Sharma (Alternate) 

ShriM. S.Sultania 

Shri Sujit Ghosh (Alternate) 

Dr A. K, Saxena 

Dr Rajindra Singh (Alternate) 

Representative 

Shr] Om Prakash 

Shri D. K. Shami {Alternate) 

Dr H. R. Rajmohan 

Dr. a. K. Mukherjee (Alternate) 

Shri P M. Rao 

Shri D. Biswas (Aliernate) 

DrB. YBapat 

Shri V, R. Narla (Alternate) 

Shri Mathura Prasad 

SiiRiMATi SuNiTA KuMAR (Alternate) 

Shri Shashi Vardhan 

Shri S. C. Gupta (Alternate) 

DrD. S.S.Ganguly 

Shri R. Srinwas an (Alternate) 

Joint Chief Controller of Explosives 

Shri M, Kant 

Shri Kirjt Maru (Alternate) 

Shri N.S. Birdie 

Shri Rabindra Nath Sahu (Alternate) 

Shri V. Jayaraman 

Shri S. Muruganandam (Aliernate) 

Shri V.K.Jain 

Shri Urmish D. Shah 



12 



IS 15809 : 2008 



Organization 
Tata Chemicals Ltd, Mithapur, Dist Jamnagar 

BIS Directorate General 



Representative(s) 

ShrjSanjivLal 

Shri M. C. Agrawal {Alternate) 

Shw E. Devendar, Scientist F & Head (CHD) 
[Representing Director General {Ex-officio)] 



Member Secretary 

Shri N. K. Pal 

Scientist E (CHD), BIS 

Occupational Safety and Health and Chemical Hazards Subcommittee, CHD 8 : 1 

Shri F M. Rao {Convener) 

Shri Abhueet Arun Saungikar 
Shri Viren Shah {Alternate) 

ShriH.S.Rawat 

Shri V. V. PA^fDE 

Shr] S. D. Bharambe 

Shri A. P. Sathe {Alternate) 

Shri J. K. Pantdey 

MsARTlBHATr 

Dr K. Kadirrelu {Alternate) 

Shri S. C. Pal 

Shri S. C. Roy Choudury {Alternate) 

Shri M. S. Sultania 

Shri B. Ghosh {Alternate) 

Shri K. Vishwanathan 

Shri V. K. Srivastava {Alternate) 

Dr p. p. Lanjewar 

Dr Brij Mohan {Alternate) 

Dr M. S. Ray 

Dr S. H. Namdas (Alternate) 

Shri P. Jayaprakash 

Shri C. Mahalingam {Alternate) 

Dr A. K. Srivastava 

Dr. S. K. Rastogi {Alternate) 

Shri Vinod Bamaniya 

Shri Sameer Dange {Alternate) 

Shr! Cyril Pereira 

Shri Hirendra Chatterjee {Alternate) 

Represet^ative 



National Safety Council, Navi Mumbai 
3M India Limited, Bangalore 

Airport Authority of India, New Delhi 
Atomic Energy Regulatory Board, Mumbai 
Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 

Central Mining Research Institute (CSIR), Dhanbad 
Centre for Fire, Explosives & Environment Safety, Delhi 

Coal India Limited, Kolkata 

Department of Defence Production (DGQA), New Delhi 

Department of Space (ISRO), Bangalore 

Directorate General Factory Advice Services & Labour 
Institute, Mumbai 

Indian Chemical Manufacturers Association, Mumbai 

Indian Telephone Industries Ltd, Bangalore 

Industrial Toxicological Research Centre, Lucknow 

Joseph Leslie & Co, Mumbai 

Joseph Leslie Drager Manufacturing Pvt Ltd, Mumbai 

National Fire Service College, Nagpur 

National Institute of Occupational Health, Ahmedabad 

National Mineral Development Corporation Ltd, Hyderabad 
Oil Industry Safety Directorate, New Delhi 

PN Safetech Private Limited, Lucknow 

Reliance Industries Limited, Mumbai 

Safety Appliances Manufacturers Association, Mumbai 

Steel Authority of India, Ranchi 
Vishvesvara Enterprises, Navi Mumbai 

Voltech (India), Delhi 



Dr H. R. Rajmohan 

Dr a. K. Mukerjee {Alternate) 

Shri D. Vidyarthi 

Shri Shashi Vardhan 

Shri S. C. Gupta {Alternate) 

Shri Rajesh Nigaw 

Shri Anil Kumar Srivastava {Alternate) 

ShriN. K. Valecha 

Shri S. G. Patel {Alternate) 

Shri M. Kant 

Shri Kirit Maru {Alternate) 

Shr! V. K. Jain 

Shri Mahesh Kudav 

Shri Ravi Siiinde {Alternate) 

Shri Pawan Kumar Pahuja 

Ms Meenakshi Pahuja {Alternate) 



MGIPF— 10 Deptt. of BIS/08~-300 Books. 



13